Master’s in Childhood General and Special Ed Course Descriptions

EDUC 502 FOUNDATIONS IN URBAN AND MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION
This course equips teachers with a sound knowledge base in multicultural education. It provides both definition and rationale. Through readings, class discussions, blackboard participation and written assignments students will explore and analyze the impact that such issues as equity, ethnicity, sociocultural and linguistic background, ability, gender and race have on student learning. Students will develop perspectives on diversity and a frame of reference for providing equitable opportunities for all students to learn and succeed in schools and society. While this course focuses more on developing dispositions and understandings needed to effectively work with diverse populations, applications to the classroom will be made when appropriate. By the conclusion of the course students will be able to articulate a personal philosophy of multicultural education that demonstrates a thoughtful consideration of the historical and social development of this field (3 credits).

EDUC 506 LANGUAGE, COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT, AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY
This course examines cognitive development and language acquisition across cultures. Through the supplemental use of various technologies the course focuses on issues of bilingualism and dialectal difference and their relationship to language development. The course explores language diversity as it relates to classroom instruction (3 credits).

EDUC 513 PSYCHOLOGY OF TEACHING AND LEARNING
An investigation of psychological theories as they apply to teaching and learning. Topics include cognitive, behavioral and humanistic theory, social development and social skills instruction, moral development and education, language development, motivation, classroom management theory and issues, and an introduction to instructional modification to meet the needs of a diverse student body. (3 credits)
Three lecture hours

EDUC 522 TEACHING MATHEMATICS IN INCLUSIVE SETTINGS
This course includes exploration of content, learning process, use of materials including technology, classroom activities, and assessment at different developmental levels as applied to elementary mathematics. Approaches to working with multicultural, multilingual, special needs, and gifted populations are addressed. Techniques of lesson planning are developed, and multidisciplinary integration is fostered. (3 credits)
Three lecture hours

EDUC 523 PRACTICUM IN CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 
This field based course is offered in conjunction with EDUC 522 and EDUC 524In addition, you will meet regularly with your field supervisor at the school site as well as a weekly seminar to review field experiences, address additional issues of pedagogy, and to align practice with theory.

The initial teaching experience that this course provides ultimately enables you to carry out specific teaching functions. Also, students will meet the professional standards in social studies and science as well as language arts as prescribed by the New York State Education Department and detailed in the EDUC 522, EDUC 524 and EDUC 526 course syllabi. (3 credits)
Students will complete a field experience consisting of 100 hours.

EDUC 524 TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES AND SCIENCE IN INCLUSIVE SETTINGS
In this course, you will explore content, learning processes, use of materials, and the classroom activities at different developmental levels as applied to elementary social studies and science. You will be introduced to planning techniques for individual lessons in both content areas, including opportunities for multidisciplinary integration with ELA (English Language Arts). You will also learn to address the special needs of students with disabilities, students with limited English proficiency, gifted students and educationally disadvantaged children although there is greater emphasis on differentiation in the second semester of study.

This course conforms to learning standards for science and social studies as defined by the New York State Department of Education. In both subject areas, you will learn to use instructional resources and strategies to cultivate critical thinking and informed decision-making with students. You will learn techniques for problem solving, working effectively with groups, gathering and organizing information, generating and analyzing ideas, observing common themes and presenting results.

The study of science and social studies will be interwoven with Language Arts, reflecting the Common Core standards that were implemented in schools during the 2011-12 school year. There are five social studies standards areas in New York State:

  1. History of New York State and the United States
  2. World History
  3. Geography
  4. Economics
  5. Civics, Citizenship and Government

In each standard area there is particular emphasis on developing an awareness of and respect for cultural diversity and multiple perspectives (3 credits).

EDUC 527 BEHAVIOR MANAGEMENT AND SOCIAL SKILLS INSTRUCTION
This course provides candidates with strategies based on behavior analysis and other psycho-educational learning theories/models and as they relate to managing measurably effective classrooms. Emphasis is on the elements of effective instructional planning (i.e., antecedents and consequences of student behavior) that prevent management problems, condition intrinsic motivation to learn, and foster social competence of all students in the inclusive classroom. The foundational knowledge base of the definition, concepts, and principles of ABA for improving students’ academic, emotional, behavioral, and social skills will be addressed. In addition, coverage will include the philosophical assumptions and dimensions of research-based models. Candidates will learn how to differentiate evidence-based from non-evidence-based behavior management practices. (3 credits)

EDUC 530 STUDENT TEACHING CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 
Students teach for one semester under the supervision of cooperating teachers and teacher education faculty.  Placements are in a grade one-six classroom in inclusive or general settings. Faculty observe and confer with student teachers individually.  In addition, students and faculty meet regularly in a coordinating seminar to review field experiences, to synthesize current practice with prior learning and to prepare for employment and further professional study.  Prospective student teachers plan for field placements during the registration period prior to student teaching. (3 credits)
Field experience—four mornings, one full day/week

EDUC 536 TEACHING LITERACY IN THE INCLUSIVE ELEMENTARY CLASSROOM
Teaching Literacy in the Inclusive Elementary Classroom examines reading and language arts instruction as part of the total communication process.  As a language-based course of study students actively participate in the learning process by reading, writing, speaking and listening.  Class work and assignments reflect this language-based perspective, provide opportunities for student inquiry and emphasize the development of competencies that are necessary to teach reading and language arts in inclusive elementary school settings.

This course develops the pre-service teacher’s ability to carry out the specific teaching functions and to achieve the professional standards as prescribed by the New York State Education Department, International Reading Association, National Council of Teachers of English and Common Core Standards for College and Career Readiness.

Students completing this course will understand the concepts of literacy instruction and the integration of reading, writing, speaking and listening for learning within the classroom. Pre-service teachers learn techniques of informal assessment and lesson planning. Instructional modifications for students with language and learning differences are presented and applied. Additionally, students will examine their own literacy practices and develop a deeper understanding of what it is to be a literate individual in the 21st century. (3 credits)

EDUC 602 RESEARCH FOR CLASSROOM TEACHERS
This course introduces strategies for designing and conducting single-subject research in special education. Competencies include coverage of independent and dependent variables for research, measurement tactics, experimental design (including data analysis), graphical presentation and evaluation of results, ethical care pertaining to human subjects, establishing generality of results, and ensuring the integrity of research procedures. The methods discussed are not specific to any disability or age level; rather, they are a general set of methods for conducting and interpreting single-subject research.

This course has two basic goals: To expose students to the principles of basic behavior analytic research methodology and to have students plan and design a research proposal. Emphasis is placed on the role of research for the teacher of students with developmental disabilities. It is expected that candidates striving to be professionals in the special education field will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to distinguish between legitimate claims of intervention efficacy and to draw conclusions of research findings in accordance with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. (3 credits)

EDUC 628 ASSESSMENT AND REMEDIATION OF LITERACY DISABILITIES
This course is a study of assessment procedures, prescriptive measures and best corrective practices as applied to teaching the reading disabled student in elementary through high school (depending upon student’s area of certification). Tutorial field experience is required in remedial or inclusive settings. (3 credits)
The course consists of three lecture hours and related field experience—16 hours/semester.

EDUC 712 STRATEGIES FOR INCLUSION OF SPECIAL LEARNERS
This course is designed to help candidates instruct students with learning and behavior problems (including autism spectrum disorders, speech and language impairments, learning disabilities, intellectual disabilities, emotional disturbance/ behavioral disorders, and ADHD) using research- or evidenced-based practices to address both curricular/instructional and social behavioral challenges in the least restrictive environment. Applied behavior analytic tactics, techniques, methods, and procedures covered in this course are derived from the concepts and principles of behavior taught in EDUC 527. Candidates will learn how to individualize and accurately implement fundamental elements of behavior change and specific behavior change procedures in order to facilitate students’ access to the general education curriculum. (3 credits)

EDUC 714 PRACTICUM IN ASSESSMENT AND INSTRUCTION OF SPECIAL LEARNERS
This course is designed to provide candidates with information on standardized and informal assessment procedures and materials and on research-based effective strategies for teaching students with mild to moderate learning and behavior problems. Emphasis is on assessment in literacy and mathematics and appropriate use of instructional technologies including assistive technology. Focus will also be on those strategies of differentiated instruction that can be effectively implemented or modified within the general education program. Candidates will learn a variety of methods for the identification and assessment of academic and social-behavioral problems; behavioral assessment; analysis of the outcomes of instruction/interventions; descriptive, preference and skill assessments; including the use of practical behaviorally-based assessment tools such as checklists, rating scales, structured observation tools, and curricular behavioral assessments (e.g., criterion-referenced assessment). (3 credits)
Students will complete a fifty hour field experience.

EDUC 716 LIFE SPAN SPECIAL EDUCATION: TRANSITION FROM BIRTH TO ADULTHOOD
This course prepares teacher candidates to select behavior analytic intervention strategies and plan for their possible unwanted behavior change effects in order to help maximize human development from birth to adulthood. Candidates will learn how to select and implement individualized behavioral and curricular intervention strategies and behavior-change systems in order to teach, maintain, and generalize skills across home, school, and community settings via organizational behavior management (OBM). Emphasis will be placed on how students develop and learn by examining the process of physical, cognitive, social, emotional, language, and career development among students who vary by gender, race and ethnicity, socioeconomic level, English proficiency, and diverse levels of ability. Issues covered include the educator’s role on how to develop curriculum as well as support and maintain group change that is developmentally appropriate and culturally meaningful to facilitate successful transition from pre-school to post-school activities; including postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment (including supported employment), independent living, and/or community participation (as described by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services May 2017 document entitled “A Transition Guide To Postsecondary Education and Employment for Students and Youth with Disabilities).”  (3 credits)

EDUC 760 STUDENT TEACHING SPECIAL EDUCATION
Students teach for one semester under the supervision and mentorship of cooperating teachers and teacher education faculty. Placements are in special education settings. Faculty observes and confers with student teachers individually. In addition, students and faculty meet each week in a coordinating seminar to review field experiences, synthesize current practice with prior learning and to prepare for employment and further professional study. (3 credits)
Prospective student teachers plan for field placements during the registration period prior to student teaching.